Robert Parker’s rating points

  • 0

Robert Parker’s rating points

Robert Parker

Robert Parker’s rating system employs a 50-100 point scale (Parker Points®), which is utilized only to enhance and complement the tasting notes, which is the primary meaning of expressing the tastings.Robert Parker is arguably the world’s most influential wine critic. His bi-monthly newsletter “The Wine Advocate” was first published in 1978, and now has a profound effect on both prices and market demand for fine wines around the world. Robert Parker’s influence on fine wine prices cannot be overstated. Historically, the wines that Robert Parker scores highest, particularly those awarded more than 90 points, tend to be the wines that show the biggest increase in value.

How it works:
Each wine is given an initial 50 points. General colour and appearance can merit up to 5 points. Aroma and bouquet are worth up to 15 points. Flavour and finish account for up to 20 points. Finally, the overall quality level or potential for further evolution and improvement-aging merit up to 10 points.

Many Bordeaux producers now wait for Parker’s ratings before setting the release price of their wines. Many wines are now produced in styles specifically designed to win ‘Parker points’, as well. Is the capital overtaking the art of wine producers?

The Parker rating explained:
96-100:
An extraordinary wine of profound and complex character displaying all the attributes expected of a classic wine of its variety. Wines of this calibre are worth a special effort to find, purchase, and consume.

90-95:
An outstanding wine of exceptional complexity and character. In short, these are terrific wines.

80-89:
A barely above average to very good wine displaying various degrees of finesse and flavour as well as character with no noticeable flaws.

70-79:
An average wine with little distinction except that it is a soundly made. In essence, a straightforward, innocuous wine.

60-69:
A below average wine containing noticeable deficiencies, such as excessive acidity and/or tannin, an absence of flavour, or possibly dirty aromas or flavours.

50-59:
A wine deemed to be unacceptable.


Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Recent Posts

BiB? You’d be surprised!

Tastin’ France ~ Dublin

The Permanent Selection…

Red German Wines

Archives

Search